Al Peterson

Meteorologist

Al Peterson
Al Peterson
Meteorologist
Al Peterson has been forecasting weather for more than 25 years now, starting in Casper, Wyoming in 1985. He received certification in broadcast meteorology from Mississippi State University and holds the coveted Seal Of Approval from The American Meteorological Society. He has been a forecaster in Oregon since 1988.

Al developed an interest in weather in his years as a commercial fisherman and accurate forecasts remain especially important to him because he restores houses as a side business and plans every day's activities around the weather conditions. Having worked "in the elements" for many years he makes an extra effort to find dry spells in the forecast to benefit painters, masons, construction workers and others who earn their livings outdoors. In addition to being a commercial fisherman Al also worked as a "juggy" and "swamper" in the oilfields of Wyoming, as a "gandy dancer" with the Burlington Northern Railroad company and as veterinarian's assistant in the horse racing industry. He is married to Jodi and is an animal lover with two dogs at home. His hobbies include investing in real estate, racing Thoroughbred horses, doing body work on automobiles, and spearfishing.

In addition to his work in meteorology Al has won national and regional awards as a journalist, the Public Service Award from the Oregon Association of Broadcasters and the SOLV citizenship award for his efforts in cleaning up Amazon Creek.

Recent stories by Al Peterson

Consumer Is it time to buy a house? Is it time to buy a house? (Video)
The slow economy does have some silver lining. A few years ago you might have thought of buying a house -- something to live in, maybe even a vacation place -- but they were too expensive. Times have changed and prices have dropped.
Consumer Thieves target catalytic converters Thieves target catalytic converters (Video)
Thieves are crawling underneath parked cars and stealing the catalytic converters to sell the platinum and other precious metals for scrap. Eugene police have seen a rise in converter thefts, with 11 reported this month so far and five in May.