Bandon still suffering from mosquito problem

Bandon still suffering from mosquito problem »Play Video
Mosquitoes are seen inside a stock cage in a mosquito labaratory at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London, Thursday, May 30, 2013. (AP Photo/Sang Tan)

BANDON, Ore. -- The Us Fish and Wildlife Service has been working with Oregon State University, doing some research at Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge on the mosquito problem that has many local residents taking refuge themselves.

Amy Fraser, a Bandon resident, says the problem is a bad one. "Personally, our quality of life is probably at a zero right now," she said. "There is no sitting outside enjoying summer unless we leave the area."

Fish and wildlife officials noticed the main cause could be unnatural topography that is retaining water brought in from high tides. "Last week we got some small equipment and started cutting small ditches to drain those small impoundments into tidal channels to get tidal circulation," said Roy Lowe.

Any fix however, won't get rid of the mosquitoes currently there, which are now having an effect on camping. "It hasn't affected our overall use at all, but we have seen campers check out early because the mosquitoes are just bothering them," said Bullard Park manager Ben Fisher.

Bandon Dunes Golf Resort is seeing an abundance of mosquitoes as well, and has placed a letter with precaution tips in each guest room.

Local stores say repellent and itch cream are flying off the shelves. "It's almost everybody that's coming in that's buying something," said Tiffany's Drug Store pharmacist Tony Arriola.

"The concern now is there are so many, what is it really going to take to get it back under control?"

Although Lowe is pretty confident they discovered the problem that brought the mosquitoes to the area, US Fish and Wildlife will continue their year-long research at the marsh.