Speedgolf: 'Get done so the wife doesn't get too upset'

Speedgolf: 'Get done so the wife doesn't get too upset'

BANDON, Ore. -- People in the area of the Bandon Dunes Golf Resort saw some people running around like crazy over the weekend.

No need to worry though, it was planned.

Tim Scott, the executive director os Speedgolf Intl., explains how 'Speedgolf' works. "Speedgolf is exactly what it sounds like, which we don't often hear speed and golf in the same sentence, but it's where you run between your shots and then you add your score and your time to figure out your time, your total score."

Jamie Young is a Speedgolf competitor, and he likes the up-tempo twist to an otherwise subtle game. "I'm a big fan of fast pace, and so, one thing that's hurt golf over the years is slow play, and so, I just think it's awesome."

Golfers are only allowed six clubs in their bag, but the rest of the rules are similar to golf, just at a much faster pace.

Nick Willis is an Olympic champion runner, and he says the sport might even help out at home. "What a fabulous concept, you can get done in under an hour so the wife doesn't get too upset when you're not pulling your duties as a father."

Coming off a silver medal performance in the 1500 meter race at the Bejing Olympics, Nick chose Speedgolf as motivation to get trainging again. "I had one of those fluke rounds where I sunk a bunker shot and made a few unexpected pars, and I was hooked ever since that," said Willis.

Jamie Young compares the key to success in Speedgolf to another Olympic event. "I think it's a lot like the Olympic sport biathalon when the cross country skiers are doing endurance and then they got to be precise on the target," he said.

Those who master the balance see their name race to the top of the leaderboard at a similar pace.