4/24/2014

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Forget deer, these hunters want to bag a drone

Forget deer, these hunters want to bag a drone
FILE - This undated file photo provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection shows an unmanned drone used to patrol the U.S.-Canadian border. The tiny plains town of Deer Trail, Colo. population 500, is considering a proposal to make itself a national attraction for gun enthusiasts and people skeptical of government surveillance. Citizens on Oct. 8 will vote on whether to issue permits to hunt drones. A $100 bounty will be rewarded to shooters who bring in debris from an unmanned aircraft "known to be owned or operated by the United States federal government." (AP Photo/U.S. Customs and Border Protection, File)
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DENVER (AP) — It's September, Colorado bow hunting is underway, and rifle hunters are lining up for a hot new license: $25 to shoot down a government drone over the village of Deer Trail.

Supporters acknowledge the licenses would be only symbolic, and a town election authorizing them is more than a month away. Still, The Denver Post reported Thursday about 1,000 people have applied for one.

Residents of the tiny plains town an hour east of Denver are still split on the proposal.

The scheme is part protest against government surveillance and part promotion to get Deer Trail some attention. It's working, at least on the second point. The federal government issued a warning against shooting at drones.

Phil Steel, who proposed the licenses, is selling novelty versions. Officials say he's given part of the income to the town.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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